Images: Colors of Curacao

Take one tropical island, add in a pastel palette of historical buildings, mix in vibrant sea water and sprinkle in the local color.

That is the brief recipe for the rainbow of hues I found on Curacao, a Caribbean island near Aruba and Bonaire. The capital city, Willemstad, is a protected UNESCO World Heritage Site, so the brilliant green, yellow, blue, pink and purple paint that outfits the buildings isn’t going anywhere, but what I most enjoyed is that, even driving out into the country, homes and shops did not shy away from color.

Many of the buildings also have fun graffiti decorating the sides. Though I’m a fan of traditional graffiti anyway, the artwork on these buildings depicts the historical roots of the country with caricatures of people and images of the island’s flora.

 

Flowers in alley in Willemstad Curacao Yellow church in Curacao

 

Blue building yellow building Curacao

 

Graffiti People in Curacao

 

Graffiti door yellow flowers Curacao

 

Floating Market Willemstad Curacao

 

Curacao Fort Fountain

10 Responses to “Images: Colors of Curacao”

  1. Liezel

    Curacao is one colorful world=) Nice shots!

    Reply
  2. leland

    much more colorful than i would have expected…thanks for sharing

    Reply
    • JoAnna

      I don’t think a lot of people realize how colorful it is – I know I didn’t! But the thing I think is most awesome about the colors is that they aren’t going anywhere as the buildings as they are, are protected by UNESCO. So you can take your time to get down there and check them out because they’ll be around for a long time!

      Reply
  3. Abbie

    I agree with Leland – definitely more colorful than I would have expected, too!

    Reply
  4. Cam

    Looks like a fun place! I love all the colours

    Reply
  5. Desiree

    Curacao is a city of vibrant colors..Such a wonderful city

    Reply
  6. Nicole

    Enjoyed seeing these. The islands of the Caribbean hold a special place in my heart. 🙂

    Reply
  7. melissa

    hey how is the Jamaican population would like to link with someone who know the ropes…

    Reply

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